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    New whooping cough vaccine a worldwide breakthrough

    02 Apr 2014 | A region on the move, Health Nutrition

    An innovative nasal whooping cough vaccine developed at Lille Pasteur Institute has successfully undergone Phase 1 trials in human subjects under Europe’s CHILD-INNOVAC research program.

    Lille Region - Institut Pasteur de Lille - vaccin contre la coqueluche

    Every year, whooping cough affects tens of millions of children and kills some 300,000 people worldwide. Under the leadership of Dr. Camille Locht, Scientific Director at the Lille Pasteur Institute, the CHILD-INNOVAC research consortium has developed an innovative new vaccine that can be administered nasally.

     “This type of vaccine has two advantages: production costs are lower than for so-called ‘second-generation’ injectable vaccines, which are prohibitively expensive for developing countries, and it can be administered even to the youngest children. Remember that even in western countries, where vaccine coverage is excellent, infants still cannot be immunized until they are two to six months old,” says Dr. Locht.

    The vaccine was developed in Lille and produced by a biotech firm in Belgium, and the clinical trials were conducted in Sweden.

    In all, ten European partners worked on the program, which also explored the possibility of combining protection against multiple pathogens in a single nasal vaccine. The researchers studied the concept of a vaccine combining protection against whooping cough and respiratory syncytial virus (a cause of bronchiolitis in infants), and showed that it could be effective.

    The vaccine has no noticeable side effects, even at high doses, and immune responses were triggered in all subjects colonized by the vaccine. The next step will involve administering higher volumes in an effort to increase the vaccine’s colonization of nasal mucosa and to improve its stability over time, with the goal of developing the drug for full-scale manufacture in the near future.

     

    Source : Institut Pasteur de Lille

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